Is premium the future of FMCG?

Is premium the future of FMCG?

Consumers are looking for premium brands and premium brands are the most successful worldwide. Premium products grew by 21% in Southeast Asia, by 23% in China between 2012 and 2014 and 26% in the USA from Apr 2015 to Apr 2016 across the home care and personal care categories, (Nielsen, 2016a). Different factors helped the growth of premium products:

  • Economic growth of middle class: Middle class is massively growing especially across emerging countries (Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, etc) and by 2030 (Reuters, 2012) will almost count 5 billion people worldwide (two times the current middle class population). This will encourage people to access a many different products and to expand their shopping basket with highest probability to trade up for premium products.

 

  • Urbanization: many people will move from the countryside or rural areas to cities and towns (from the current 2 billion to 5 billion by 2030, Nielsen, 2016b) gaining access to more services who will help to raise the premium products consumption. For instance, even more people will access Internet to be informed and buy and even more people will access convenience store or specialised stores to purchase premium products.

 

  • Digitalization: At the beginning of 2017 more than half the global population uses a smartphone, almost two-thirds has a mobile phone, more than half of all mobile connections are now ‘broadband’ and arond 20% of the world’s population shopped online in the past 30 days (We Are Social, 2017) Thanks to this data and thinking about the massive digital future growth more and more consumers will be affected by the effects of the omnichannel. The combination of different and many touchpoints any time and anywhere will make information more accessible and, as a result, many consumers more influenced by advertising, educational information, promotions, etc.

 

  • Wider offer available (private labels and brands). If in the past only manufacturers offered premium brands in last 10 years we saw a new phenomenon showing how even retailers could launch premium labels on the market moving from aggressive promotion and discounting to better and higher quality in their offer (especialy on food and beverage).On top, we can also talk about the rising of local brands and smaller countries which, although a different impact depending on the countries and regions, massively contribute to increase the percentage of premium products on the market.

 

1. What are consumers looking for?

According to Nielsen (2016a) many reasons encourage consumers to buy premium products. Results are different across different countries, regions and consumers generations:

  • Overall there is no always a correlation between highest incomes and premium products purchase rate. Indeed, the study (Nielsen, 2016a) shows how in many countries and regions a better salary doesn’t always influence the attitude to spend more.
  • Price is not the only attribute consumers link to premium products. Only 31% of global respondents declared to think about a premium product when the price is high. On the other hand quality and performance are considered a plus. Quality and performances change depending on the product category we are talking about. For food quality is made by the ingredients used to make that product, while for a home care product by the effectiveness of a formulation. Other factors are the design or the brand name. The bottle design for a detergent or the brand awareness might be decisive to encourage consumers to purchase a product in a certain category regardless the quality and the performance. Even sustainable attributes are relevant especially among the youngest generations (Millennials and Generation Z).
  • Social aspirations and status are important: many respondents, especially in emerging countries, declared that buying premium products increases their self-esteem, feel them better or more confident about themselves as individual or as members of social groups.

2. Private Labels vs brands: what’s the status?

The relevant growth of the premium fmcg products on shelf has been also facilitated by the launch of premium private labels. From the report (Nielsen, 2014) we can see how Europe, North America and Oceania, are the main region wolrdwide in terms of private labels presence. In Italy (Il Sole 24 Ore, 2016) premium and bio private labels products generated €1.32 billion (13.2% of the total private label segment value of the market in Sept 2016, respectively + 14% and +16.1%, vs Sept 2015). On the other hand low cost private labels lost share (-22% in value vs Sept 2015) only representing 2.6% of the total private label segment.

Figure 1: Premium Private Labels products in Italy, branded “Top Esselunga” 

premium products in italy prodotti_top

 

Local retailers massively invested in brand management and innovations in recent years building a high brand equity across different categories, with the main goal of creating store loyalty and getting better trade terms conditions vs manufacturers. However, there are categories (such as personal care) showing highest and similar value share across different regions around the world.

For brands the premium fmcg path is almost mandatory. Brands should continue to raise investments in brand management through marketing investments in communication and innovations, to better communicate the uniqueness of their value proposition and make their brand equity stronger. In order to do so, heavily marketing research investments looking for new and unmet needs among consumers are required to get the right consumer insights.

However perception of brands vs private labels even for premium products changes depending on the region and on the country. In Europe, Latin America, North America and Oceania, there is a high qualitative perception of private labels, considered as key SKUs able to drive brand differentiation and store loyalty. On the other hand the situation is completely different in Africa, Asia and Middle East, where consumers show the highest willingness to pay premium prices for brands. Most of the respondents still consider buying private labels too risky.

 

3. Management Implications

 

  • Only some products can be upgraded (Nielsen, 2016a): Personal Care is the main category across many regions showing highest differentation and innovations rate vs other products categories. Regardless this trend, differences and opportunities across categories are different depending on the country and on the region. Premium perceptions are not the same worldwide for all products and categories.

 

Figure 2: Premium’s Value share per Category across different global regions (Nielsen, 2016a)

Premium products growth

  • Think global act local: Differences are relevant depending on the market and the region we are taking into account. This implies how even marketing strategy should be locally adapted to support the launch of a premium product on the long-term, depending on the market area to be served.

 

  • Focus on digital and optimize your in-store visibility: In order to get highest results and makes the product successful an excellent quality, distribution or price are not enough. Firms and professionals need to find the right communication. Depending on products peculiarities firms need to find a balance between touchpoints showing highest awareness and trials (typically TVCs and high store visibility) and touchpoints showing a high degree of persuasion (e.g. digital). In many cases both brands and private labels are still struggling to achieve these goals.

 

 

SOURCES

 

Il Sole 24 Ore (2016), Private Label, la corsa è premium, December, http://www.ilsole24ore.com/art/impresa-e-territori/2016-12-09/private-label-e-corsa-premium-110740.shtml?uuid=ADFrDIGC

Nielsen (2016a), Moving on Up, December

Nielsen (2016b), The Dirt on Cleaning, April

Nielsen (2014), The State Of Private Label Around The World, November

Reuters (2012), The Swelling Middle, http://www.reuters.com/middle-class-infographic

We Are Social (2017), Digital in 2017: Global Overview

Top 10 food trends in Europe

Top 10 food trends in Europe

Top 10 food trends in Europe:

Dried vegetables, protein-rich yogurt, burger without beef. These products are not only the core of organic shops, they become alternatives increasingly popular with consumers who aspire to a generally healthier diet … even if sugary is still a venial sin assumed. Overview of these top 10 food trends observed in Europe with Innova Market and Nielsen insights.

1 – Go with Transparency

27% of Europeans would like to stop eating transformed products. Consumers want a clear list of ingredients and transparency of the recipe. Some supplier don’t hesitate to highlight the recipe. In France, Marie made the brand name of one their product “All Simply “, where the ingredient list intends to be as short as reassuring. In US, for jerky products, local producer, Wild Merman, highlights  the nutrition facts.

top10food_marie        salmonjerky_1

2 – Go with Flexitarian

The soft vegetarian which consume meat in small quantity, has grown by 25% between 2011 and 2015. Vegetable Nuggets for kids, vegan salami and other alternatives are under expansion. Retailer like Carrefour adopted this trend with its private label “Carrefour Veggie” in France. In US, Hilary’s Mediterranean vegan burgers were recognized as a lighter and healthier version of a fried falafel.

top10food_veggie       hilary veggie

3 – Go with“0%”

There is now 12% desired gluten-free products, with an increase of 30% between 2011 and 2015. If these customers still a niche, the image is such that some products naturally gluten or lactose, even boast of his absence! The offer is growing, Innova Market’s insights noted, indeed a huge 26% increase of products bearing the words “without” the last four years. Recently in UK, Coca cola launched its new brand ‘Coca Cola Zero Sugar’ to highlight the fewer calories. In 2020 they target more than 50% of their sells from Diet coke range. Bjorg, widely known for their Gluten-free assortment, are present in 1/3 home in France.

top10food_zero top10food_bjorg

4 – Go with Natural Process

Key success is to enhance naturalness of the products, betting on natural and ancestral manufacturing methods. Fresh prepared goods are highly valued by retailers. Nestlé yogurt brand “La Laitière” use this image of ancestral fabrication indicating that only the fermentation participated in rendering its dairy product. Private label as “Carrefour Lunch Time” highlights this natural made image.

top10food_lalaitire top10food_salad

5 – Go with Vegetables & Fruits

These plants have never been so good news! If their benefits are globally well communicated, its hegemony is now spread in many product categories. For example fruit juice, a quarter of new products marketed in 2015 has at least one vegetable in their composition, against 16 % in 2011. Another trend that follows, the soup acquires acclaim . In Spain, the cold & hot soups are increasingly premium, like the brand Tio or Mucho Gazpacho

vegetable souptop10food_tio

6 – Go with Labels

The origin is a new recurring motif in the marketing of food products. Recognized labels linked to the origin of products tend to comfort consumers. The development of protected geographical indications (PGI) help brands to seduce shoppers. In France, as each year, Herta (Nestle) and Fleury Michon still the most loved brands, their labels play a large part of this success.

top10food_ham top10food_herta

7 – Go with Local

Local taste preference dominates: Local companies often have a deeper understanding of consumer tastes in their market and can respond more quickly to changing needs. Local products are a great way through which to differentiate, able to reinforce the link with local farmers and producers and provide a guarantee of food security. Retailers know how to link local farmer to shopper mostly through private label. Carrefour has one especially for Italy (Terre d’Italia) and France (Reflets de France). Virginia Tea company is a popular start up which promotes the American East Coast tea with an exclusive local sourcing.

top 10 food trends  top 10 food trends

 

8 – Go with Protein

Rich-protein products keep healthy. These products, originally created to satisfy athletes, are now desired by the mass market. Rich protein yogurt are a good example in terms of diversification as Danone did with Light & fit assortment. In a more local format, Think Jerky got funded in two month in 2015 by proposing a creative and healthy snack offer.

top10food_danonethinkjerky

 

9 – Go with Fun

In 2020, Millennials will be the largest group of shoppers worldwide. Global mobile penetration will be 70% and the main influencing device will be online video. Buzz create an emotional link with the product, well-executed humor appeal, enhances recollection, evaluation and the intent to purchase. Doritos Roulette is a famous case, containing some ultra-spiced chips, makers claims they are the hottest sold in the UK. Jelly Belly is also well-known among younger in this concept, they even created a board game with their candies. In YouTube they are both doing the buzz with more than ten millions views.

top10food_jelly top 10 food trends

 

10 – Go with Exoticism

Discovering new foreign flavours still a famous trend and constantly renewed. Exotic products remain a niche market which contributes to renew the offer. It’s important for retailer and supplier to find the exotic touch of the moment. As Asian flavours are quite trendy in Europe nowadays, Unilever with his local brand Conimex in the Netherlands and global brand, Knorr Asia.

   

 

Source: Innova Market Insights, Nielsen, Kantar TNS, top 10 food trends

This Ice Cream doesn’t melt !

This Ice Cream doesn’t melt !

Eating ice cream is often about timing

You need to devour it fast enough to avoid the sticky mess of melting frozen dairy product intruding around your fingers, but slowly enough to avoid a brain-freeze. If only science could help us. Oh wait, it can, “yeah science!”

The magician: Robert Collignon, a young entrepreneur such passionate into ice cream “that he quit his job for a van and an astronaut spacesuit”: From this moment  Gastronaut Ice Cream is born.

dryic_4

The Innovation:

Robert sourced super-premium organic ice cream made in Brooklyn. Instead, of scooping it and put it in a cone he slice it into rectangles and put it into a freeze-dryer for a day. After it’s freeze-dried, it tastes just as good as the frozen ice cream it started with.

dryic_1

Alright isn’t looking as an Italian gelato, but still, we wanna bite it !

 

Anytime, everywhere

Ice cream category is famous for being highly dependent on weather, and when this one is not always great like this last summer in Europe, consequences can be disastrous.

But it’s not just ice cream eaters who could benefit. Manufacturers and retailers wouldn’t have to fret so much about deep-freezing the product during transportation and storage.

dryic_2

Premium & Organic

Already 4 premium tastes: Mint Chocolate chip, Cookie cream, Mexican chocolate chip, Peanut butter Chocolate chip

dryic_3

Get-up-and-go

For the moment, Gastronaut’s ambition is to be freeze-dried in a large commercial machine. This helps bring down the cost because nobody wants to pay $18 a bar, no matter how good it tastes.

To sum up:

  • 100 % organic
  • Super Premium IC
  • No artificial colors
  • No refrigeration needed
  • No dependent of the weather
  • The company fund investment to make it big
  • Very popular in the social media

Keep growing innovation !

Magnum extends pop-up stores opening for High-end customers!

Magnum extends pop-up stores opening for High-end customers!

Unilever bet on high-end segment while Magnum extends pop-up stores

Eskimo dipped in chocolate sauce, caramelized almonds coated with silver and puffed cereal … In the overall pop-up stores extension, Magnum extends pop-up stores in Paris and allows customization of their ice cream stick for 5 euros! After Amsterdam, London, Singapore or Florence, Magnum moved to Paris for five months in a space with brand colors, gold and brown. In total there will be 24 stores worldwide during the season, mainly in Europe, US, China and South Africa. “This is a unique way of talking about Magnum and make an exceptional experience to consumers,” says Solenn Paillard, responsible for the brand in France.

Magnum extends pop-up stores in Napoli

Unilever, which does not provide permanent shops, hope to capitalize on the performance of Magnum, the leading brand in France: Sales grew by 9% last year to reach 150 million euros.

Magnum extends pop-up stores under Unilever brand

Unilever remains particularly active in grocery innovation space last year – its hosted a Pink and Black party on Regent Street in May in London.

Starting with a simple ice cream, Magnum takes shape in minutes, the rhythm of the choices and desires of each : chocolate is coated with our choice , we decorate topping ( toasted caramelized almonds , chocolate chips, sugar chips blackberry , roasted pistachios , silver puffed cereal … ) , it’s expected that everything freezes , one takes pictures and savoring its ice ! A unique and personalized tasting experience to discover during the summer.

Keep growing DTC !